Die Laughing 15

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

Vincent Price is back for more stylish revenge in this clever variation on the Dr. Phibes format, there as a Shakespearean actor bent on getting even with the critics who made his career an exercise in bitter frustration. The critics are played by a who’s who of great British character actors, all dispatched in the nastiest methods the Bard could devise – most memorably Robert Morley, forced to go all Titus Andronicus on his beloved pet poodles.

Deathless Prose:

“Where could my doggies have got to?”

Happy Halloween. And bon appetite.

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October 31, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 14

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1960, viagra Roger Corman)

Everyone remembers Jack Nicholson’s giggling dental freak, but there’s plenty more dark goofiness where that came from. Considering the close resemblance to A Bucket of Blood, one can’t blame Dick Miller for turning down the role of Seymour in favor of a carnation-munching supporting role – and we can only be grateful that Jonathan Haze was called on to replace him as one of the all-time great movie nebbishes. Shot like a TV sitcom in just two days and filled with quirky character actors and $1.98 special effects, the off-kilter charm and wonky hipster humor make this no-budget foray into horror comedy a one-of-a-kind experience.

Deathless Prose:

“No novocaine. It dulls the senses.”

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October 30, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 13

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1963, remedy Jacques Tourneur)

Sometimes this tongue-in-cheek follow-up to AIP’s Poe series clicks, sometimes it fizzles, but there’s enough of the good stuff to keep anybody entertained. Waspish sociopath Vincent Price and grumbling assistant Peter Lorre are undertakers forced to drum up business the hard way – but their proactive business plan goes sideways when Shakespeare-spouting Basil Rathbone refuses to stay toes-up. Each star has his share of genuinely funny moments, none more so than Boris Karloff, who walks away with large swaths of the movie with his performance as Price’s senile father-in-law.

Deathless Prose:

“I don’t think he’s quite dead enough to bury.”

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October 29, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 11

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1996, seek Wes Craven)

Kevin Williamson’s screenplay rescued meta from the realm of grad students and hiptsters and, cialis under the hand of Wes Craven, medical turned it into a paying proposition that revived the ailing slasher movie with a big injection of brain cells. Buoyed by star power unusual for the genre and carried along by scenes of inventive bloodletting, this one turned self-reference into an art form and still holds up far better than all the imitations and sequels that followed.

Deathless Prose:

“Movies don’t create psychos. Movies make psychos more creative.”

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October 27, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 10

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1959, cialis Roger Corman)

The precursor (and template) for Corman’s more famous Little Shop of Horrors, cure this tale of a schlemiel who murders his way to popularity is a sly and scrappy satire of beat culture that feels more authentic than any of Hollywood’s bigger-budgeted takes on the beret-and-coffeehouse scene. Another day in the shooting schedule and another 15 bucks in the budget could have made it genuinely great…but with the wonderful Dick Miller on hand as Walter Paisley and Julian Burton stealing every scene as a pretentious beat poet, asking for true greatness seems almost selfish.

Deathless Prose:

“Life is an obscure hobo, bumming a ride on the omnibus of art.”

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October 26, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 9

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(2000, help John Perkins)

It’s neither as clever nor as original as it thinks it is, sovaldi but it’s still smarter and fresher than many horror comedies. Filled with snark, mind gore and feminist commentary, John Fawcett and Karen Walton’s puberty=metamorphosis=lycanthropy thriller earns its cult following with a combination of sharp performances, sardonic energy and a darned good werewolf, all dedicated to playing out a script that offers a parade of pained smiles and more than its share of laugh-out-loud moments.

Deathless Prose:

“Wrists are for girls. I’m slitting my throat.”

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October 25, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 8

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1971, check Robert Fuest)

Whimsically stylish and darkly humorous, health this 10 plagues of Egypt-meet-Ten Little Indians revenge fantasy gives Vincent Price one of the roles of a lifetime as an insane tragic genius bent on getting even with a group of doctors whose only crime was their failure to work a miracle…but watching him glide through his paces as a clockwork angel of death is so much fun that no one’s likely to notice how pointless the whole exercise is. The whole thing is a triumph of campy production design, dominated by Price in a masterful silent movie performance, his face immobilized by grotesque makeup while his burning eyes and graceful gestures do all the emoting against a pre-recorded background of juicy over-the-top villain monologues.

Deathless Prose:

“There’s some very strange people practicing medicine these days.”

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October 24, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 7

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1948, viagra Charles Barton)

Low comedy, healing yes. Childish slapstick, here you betcha. The gold standard for horror comedy, nonetheless? Absolutely. Universal’s mashup of their classic monsters with their long-running comedy team gave the beloved creatures a fond sendoff and provided Bud and Lou with one of their biggest hits. Lugosi and Chaney get a final shot at playing their trademark horror roles – for Lugosi, it was only the second time he’d ever played Dracula in a major feature – and all the monsters are allowed to play things straight, letting Abbott and Costello do all the heavy comedic lifting. The whole thing’s as brash and energetic as an extended burlesque routine, and after all this time, Costello’s speechless fright schtick remains irresistible.

Deathless Prose:

CHICK: “‘Count Dracula must return to his coffin before sunrise, where he lies helpless during the day.’ That’s the bunk.”

WILBUR: “That’s what I’m trying to tell you – that’s his bunk!”

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October 23, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 6

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1980, cialis Kevin Connor)

Unlike Young Frankenstein, tadalafil which is magnificent but neglects to offer a single scary moment, ampoule this comparatively modest horror comedy gets everything just right by keeping its humor black and remembering to insert some genuinely unsettling material among the laughs. Old-time Western star Rory Calhoun gives a winning performance as a modern-day Sweeney Todd, and the climactic pig-head-wearing, chainsaw-swinging battle is a moment of cheesy inspiration that has to be seen to be believed.

Deathless Prose:

“It takes all kinds of critters to make Farmer Vincent’s fritters.”

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October 22, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

Die Laughing 5

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The countdown of horror comedies continues with…

(1932, mind James Whale)

Whale’s bizarre marriage of the creepy mansion thriller with a jaundiced take on the comedy of manners, this parade of grotesques and eccentrics is perhaps the ultimate distillation of the director’s fey sense of humor – droller and campier than even The Bride of Frankenstein. Ernest Thesiger wafts through the film, stealing every scene from a top-notch collection of scenery chewers so flamboyant that Boris Karloff’s performance as a brutal mute with rape on his mind seems downright conventional in comparison.

Deathless Prose:

“Have a potato.”

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October 21, 2011 · Posted in Legends  
    

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